This Nursing Home Is Proof That the Times They Have a-Changed

A New Nursing Home Design Shows Us What’s Possible When We Build for People, Instead of Jamming People Into Buildings

Advances in technology have changed the way that we live in every way imaginable—from communication to recreation to aging.

We don’t talk on the telephone anymore, we speak to each other through hand-held computers.

Wooden roller coasters? The amusement parks keep them not so much to sell tickets but as art pieces and proof of longevity.Thinking about nursing home design is changing... finally.

And the choices available to the elderly have increased dramatically since our grandparents’ and parents’ time—indeed, even within our own time.

Nursing homes—much maligned and, many would argue, for good reason—are also experiencing transformations… so much so as to make them unrecognizable to the generations that came before us.

Soon, “nursing home” won’t even be the right term. But “Elder Care Village”… that’ll come closer.

It may seem that eldercare models, especially where living arrangements are involved, have been slow to change. Maybe they have. And no doubt there is still plenty of work to be done.

Consider, though, that about 450 years passed between the invention of the printing press and the first official radio broadcast.

Add another 60 years, give or take, before color televisions were the norm in the average American home…

And then 30 more before cell phones were a common sight on the street.

Now, just over two years since the iPhone 5 was released, it’s old news.

We build on the efforts of those who’ve come before us. But, perhaps more important than the gadgets that we create, is the way that our thinking collectively evolves…

Like the proverbial snowball, we’re picking up size and speed.

And this is as true for the way we conceive of spending our golden years as it is for anything else.

Finally.

When All Nursing Homes Are Like This One, Only the Hell-Bent Critics Will Bad Mouth Them

We’ve never claimed to be huge fans of nursing homes here at Care for You. In fact, we’ve stated very clearly that we aren’t—that our experiences with our own parents and grandparents led us to create a company that would help seniors choose where, and how, they wanted to live.

But if when all nursing homes are like this one, we’ll be happy to tell a different story.

Check out what Jean Makesh, CEO of Lantern Assisted Living facilities, had to say about what inspired him to start making some serious changes in the way that elder care is provided.

“I thought I knew a lot about elderly care. The more and more time I was spending with my clients, that’s when I realized, ‘Oh my god, I have no clue.'” 

And what he did—by putting his clients first—is create a phenomenal memory-care facility that just raised the bar for everyone.

Residents live in their own “homes”—on quiet streets reminiscent of the neighborhoods they grew up in—instead of in rooms or units. They get to see sunrise and sunset. Throughout the day they hear the sounds of nature and smell fresh aromas.

And it’s all happening indoors.Nursing Home Design that puts the resident first.

The sounds and scents are piped in, the ceiling is digital, and the homes open up onto carpet made to look like grass.

It’s not the real thing, but the environment that’s been created goes a long way towards mimicking it and keeps elderly residents—many of whom have severe dementia, are prone to wandering off or otherwise getting confused—safely out of the cold and away from other dangers like traffic.

Makesh says, “What if we design an environment that looks like outside? What if I can have a sunrise and sunset inside the building? What if I’m able to have the moon and stars come out? What if I build a unit that takes residents back to the ’30s and ’40s?”

They did. And their residents are thriving.

Now it’s time for everybody else to follow suit.


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The quotes in this article are via Upworthy. Read that post here.

 

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